In our last MSOC post we gave a brief introduction to the ColdFusion application framework's event handlers. With this post, we'll give a brief explanation of the onApplication handlers.

onApplicationStart

The CFC constructor is the first thing that processes on a request, but the first request to an application will then run the onApplicationStart() method. This method will run prior to any other code in the request, and is your opportunity to setup variables in the shared APPLICATION scope. Within the onApplication handlers, you are able to manipulate the APPLICATION scope without being required to lock access to the scope, as no other process can access the variables until the method is completed, and preventing race conditions.

The APPLICATION scope is a where you place those variables you will use throughout the entire application. For instance, you may wish to keep a simple variable that holds the phone number for your Customer Support team, so that if the number changes it can instantly update throughout the site. The APPLICATION scope is also where you would store objects that you would use throughout your application, like a user or page manager.

onApplicationEnd

As you might have guessed, this is the last method to fire during the lifetime of your application. In your constructor you would have set THIS.applicationTimeout. This is the length of time that the application will continue to live after it's last request. After this timeout limit is reached is when the onApplicationEnd will fire. This allows you to do some cleanup, or some application level logging. It is important to note that this only occurrs if the application does timeout. It will not fire if the server instance is shutdown/restarted.

Consider This

When you want to write to the APPLICATION scope from one of the other event handlers, you must lock access to prevent race conditions. You may, in your onServerStart method, have created a struct to log each active application (start up, last hit, timeout, number of sessions). When accessing the SERVER scope, you must also lock access.

You also have to heavily consider how much work you're putting into each of these event handlers, especially within the onApplicationStart. The more process you have there, the longer the startup time is for your application. It will be up to you just how much of a trade off that startup time is to the overall performance of your application.

The last thing you must consider (and I'll say this a lot during this series) is what variables and objects belong in what scopes. Remember that everything you place in the APPLICATION scope adds to the overall RAM utilization of that app. Everything you place in the SESSION scope will add to the overall RAM utilization of that session. This is especially important to consider in an MSOC environment. Try to think of it in these terms: the size of the SERVER scope + THE size of every APPLICATION + the size of every SESSION in every application must be less than the amount of RAM allocated to your ColdFusion instance. Careful planning is critical.

In our next piece we'll discuss the onSession event handlers. Hopefully you're finding this series beneficial. As always, any feedback/comments/questions are welcome.