It's been a very busy year, up til now. Work ramped up in February, contracting me for additional hours for a month and a half straight, after which I've worked on a sting of side projects. This helped me finance a move to Jacksonville, Florida. My new (daytime) job is full-time telecommute, which allows me to put my desk anywhere. Teresa wanted to get back to sunshine and beaches, being tired of the cold and snow of Tennessee winters, and chose Jacksonville for it's location and proximity to family and friends. Jacksonville is a great area, and we nailed a terrific place in Fleming Island. I like it because there's lots of tech (user groups and such), and it's not far from other tech centers (Orlando, Tampa, Atlanta, etc). It doesn't hurt that I can maintain a year around tan or that the beach is a short drive away.

A lot of work has come my way, often tacking an additional 40 to 60 hours a week on top of my normal day job schedule. Often I'll take a project that takes a week or two, then take a few weeks off to spend with the family (and catch up on my reading). I have a list of posts I need to write, due to exposure to some projects I hadn't previously been exposed to. Part of that already started with some exposure to the DataTables JQuery plugin, but I'm also lining up posts for jqGrid, jsTree, and the cfUniForm project. Evernote is filling up with little tidbits. The most difficult piece is coming up with the time to write examples. I'm particular about writing well formed code and documentation, which is why my posts sometimes get spaced out a bit.

One of the things I have discovered, in my exposure to these other projects, is how much I miss working with Ext JS day-to-day. JQuery UI is a good project, but lacks the maturity of Ext JS, and is missing too many key components for writing web applications (Data Stores, Grid, Tree, Menus, Tooltips, etc). My exposure to those other projects was an attempt to fill needs for which Ext JS would have been better suited, while locked into using JQuery UI. The JQuery UI team is working on closing that gap, but there is a lot of catch up necessary to match the breadth and power of Ext JS.

Speaking of Ext JS, Packt Publishing asked me to write the next Ext JS book on my own. While very flattered, I had to carefully weigh what that commitment would mean. Ultimately, I could not justify committing seven and a half months to writing the book with all of the other responsibilities I have right now. I will write a few articles for Packt (as part of my contract on the last book), but feel like I can continue to create blog content that would be more timely (no six month editorial process) and have a greater reach, and do so as my schedule permits without being a burden on my family. Sencha has already announced What to Expect in Ext JS 4.1, and recently put Ext Designer 1.2 in Beta, so there's a lot to talk about here.

Last, but definitely not least, I'm following all the buzz about the upcoming ColdFusion "Zeus". A quick Google Search already brings up a ton of info that Adobe has put out regarding the next version of the ColdFusion server platform, and it looks to once again be a significant release. Some of the big things already mentioned have been the move from JRun to Tomcat, the retirement of Verity in favor of Solr, the upgrade to Axis 2, and the inclusion of closures in CFML. That's just some of what's coming, as Adobe appears to be giving more and more detail during the various conferences through the year (and you never know the whole story until it's released).