ColdFusion Dev needed: South Florida

Ellie Taylor called me this morning, looking for a solid ColdFusion developer in south Florida.

Beacon Hill Technologies is seeking a Coldfusion/SQL Devloper for a direct hire or contract position with a large financial company in Coral Springs FL.

Required Skills:

  • Expert in Coldfusion (5+ years/current)
  • Advanced skills in MS-SQL
  • Strong skills in Java, JQuery and Crystal Reports
  • Must be able to design, develop and document
  • Local Area Candidate Preferred
  • Position is Onsite in Coral Springs

Top 3 skills:

  • Certified in Coldfusion
  • Strong in SQL- They will be doing extensive updates to the database
  • Strong Java/Jquery skills

This opportunity is for a long term contract if you are interested but only looking for permanent this can be negotiated. The opportunity is with a large fast paced financial firm. The reason for the need is due to their tremendous growth this past year.

Please feel free to reach me (Ellie Taylor) directly, they are looking to do interviews this week.

eBay Looking for a ColdFusion Developer

Ben Smith, of Panzer Solutions, sent me an email stating that eBay is looking for a ColdFusion developer to work on their Marketing Resource Management solution (MARS). Here are the particulars:

Job Title : ColdFusion Developer Location : San Jose, CA Duration : 3+ months with extensions Required Skills: Excellent working knowledge of ColdFusion

Job Description: The ColdFusion developer will augment eBay's Marketing Resource Management solution (MARS), built in ColdFusion, based on pre-defined and prioritized business and technical requirements.

If you're interested, click on his name (at the top of this post) and send him the latest version of your resume.

Skinning Bootstrap Tabs

Bootstrap is the number one downloaded project on GitHub today. A small, lightweight framework for layout, Bootstrap is a combination of CSS, HTML format, and JavaScript that allows one to create very dynamic, responsive web sites and applications. This isn't a new concept, being the same sort of thing that jQueryUI and Ext JS are conceptually designed for. Each has their merits, and differences. Those libraries primarily utilize JavaScript for designing and configuring layouts and components, whereas Bootstrap focuses primarily on HTML and CSS (and a small JS file for event handling) for building these things.

One of the things that sets Bootstrap apart is the ease with which one can "skin" the library. Bootstrap uses LESS for building it's CSS files. LESS allows you to define variables and functions, that are then utilized in style declarations. Once compiled, those variables and functions are parsed in the definitions, to create your CSS. By changing a few variables, you can completely change the look and feel of your application.

In this example, I'm going to change the default Bootstrap tab display. When you see the default Bootstrap tabs, they aren't always easily identified as a tabbed interface, until you mouse over a tab. My clients have become used to the contrast provided by the layouts of the other libraries I've mentioned, having seen those interfaces time and again. Here, we'll update the Bootstrap tabs so that they appear more like those used by jQueryUI.

Basic File Structure

I, personally, don't like to change a libraries files. Even though you can do so, I find it better to create an "override" file that will add or change a definition. That way, if I update that library I'm not trying to find and replicate my changes. First, I start off by organizing my assets. I personally like to separate my CSS from my images from my scripts. I also like to create sub-folders under each, to further organize my assets for easy change, management, and retrieval. From Bootstrap's Getting Started page, I downloaded both the basic download, as well as the "source" download. I moved the .less files out of the css folder in the "source" distribution, placing them in /assets/css/bootstrap. I then moved the .js files out of the js folder in the "basic" distribution, placing them in /assets/js/bootstrap. Last, I took the .png files, out of the img folder in either distro, and put them in to the /assets/img/bootstrap folder. The last thing I'm going to do is create a new sub-folder to the css folder, titled core. Within this folder I'm going to create three files: core.less, overrides.less, and variables.less.

Getting started with LESS

We're going to start off by doing something really simple. First I told you that I didn't want to change the core Bootstrap files, but instead create "overrides". Since we changed the basic file structure of the Bootstrap distro, the first thing we'll need to do is correct the pathing to the image sprites. What we're going to do, rather than including the Bootstrap css directly, is create our own "core" file. "Core" needs to include Bootstrap, and then our overrides. We do this by adding the following lines to our core.less.

view plain print about
1@import "../bootstrap/bootstrap.less";
2
3@import "overrides.less";

These statements will include these two files, when core.less is compiled. If you go back and look at bootstrap.less, you will see that it is nothing but import statements as well.We want to create variables that we might need to reuse elsewhere. This is the general purpose of our variables.less file. If we open Bootstrap's variables.less file (/assets/css/bootstrap), we can search through it and find two specific variables: @iconSpritePath, and @iconWhiteSpritePath. Copy and paste these two lines into our variables.less file, then adjust their paths to coincide with our new file locations.

view plain print about
1// Sprite icons path
2@iconSpritePath: "/assets/img/bootstrap/glyphicons-halflings.png";
3@iconWhiteSpritePath: "/assets/img/bootstrap/glyphicons-halflings-white.png";

Finally, we need to use these updated variables in our overrides.less file, to override the proper style declarations. First we add the import statement that includes our variables.less file. Then, we find the declarations, in the sprites.less file (/assets/css/bootstrap), that currently define these paths (you can search for the variable names). Copy and paste these two declarations into our overrides.less file, and then take out all of the definition items except for those that define the background images. Our override only needs to "override" the background image paths, keeping everthing else.

view plain print about
1@import "variables.less";
2
3/* Icon Sprite Path Overrides */
4[class^="icon-"],
5[class*=" icon-"] {
6 background-image: url("@{iconSpritePath}");
7}
8
9/* White icons with optional class, or on hover/focus/active states of certain elements */
10.icon-white,
11.nav-pills >
.active > a > [class^="icon-"],
12.nav-pills > .active > a > [class*=" icon-"],
13.nav-list > .active > a > [class^="icon-"],
14.nav-list > .active > a > [class*=" icon-"],
15.navbar-inverse .nav > .active > a > [class^="icon-"],
16.navbar-inverse .nav > .active > a > [class*=" icon-"],
17.dropdown-menu > li > a:hover > [class^="icon-"],
18.dropdown-menu > li > a:focus > [class^="icon-"],
19.dropdown-menu > li > a:hover > [class*=" icon-"],
20.dropdown-menu > li > a:focus > [class*=" icon-"],
21.dropdown-menu > .active > a > [class^="icon-"],
22.dropdown-menu > .active > a > [class*=" icon-"],
23.dropdown-submenu:hover > a > [class^="icon-"],
24.dropdown-submenu:focus > a > [class^="icon-"],
25.dropdown-submenu:hover > a > [class*=" icon-"],
26.dropdown-submenu:focus > a > [class*=" icon-"] {
27 background-image: url("@{iconWhiteSpritePath}");
28}

Ok, now that you have the mechanics out of the way, all you need to do is compile your file. If you use a dynamic server side language (ColdFusion for instance), then you might be using an asset management framework that will automatically compile LESS files for you at runtime (I like cfStatic). But, you can always get a standalone compiler that will process your files manually. There are many freeware programs available on the web. I Googled "Windows LESS compiler", and came up with WinLess. I was able to plugin the folder name, select my core.less file (you only need to compile the one, as it includes the rest), and hit "compile" to get my core.css file created.

I unselected the Minify option, so that could see the underlying result in an easy to read format. For production code, I suggest having a minified and unminified version, using the unminified for debugging purposes. If you check your new, unminified core.css file, you can go all the way to the bottom and see your two overriding style declarations, verifying that they now reflect the updated sprite paths.

Creating Tabs

OK, we have the basics out of the way. Now lets make some tabs. First, lets write up an index.html that will be prepared for Bootstrap, using our new all-in-one css file.

view plain print about
1<!DOCTYPE html>
2<html lang="en">
3 <head>
4 <meta charset="utf-8">
5 <title>Bootstrap Themed Nav</title>
6 <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
7 <meta name="description" content="">
8 <meta name="author" content="">
9 <link href="assets/css/core/core.css" rel="stylesheet">
10 <!-- Le HTML5 shim, for IE6-8 support of HTML5 elements -->
11 <!--[if lt IE 9]>
12 <script src="http://html5shim.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js"></script>
13 <![endif]-->

14 </head>
15 <body>
16 <div class="container">
17
18 </div>
19 <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
20 <script src="assets/js/bootstrap/bootstrap.min.js"></script>
21 </body>
22</html>

The next thing we need is the proper markup to create a tabbed interface within Bootstrap.

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1<ul id="myTab" class="nav nav-tabs">
2 <li class="active"><a data-toggle="tab" href="#home">Home</a></li>
3 <li><a data-toggle="tab" href="#profile">Profile</a></li>
4 <li><a data-toggle="tab" href="#tab3">Tab3</a></li>
5 <li><a data-toggle="tab" href="#tab4">Tab 4</a></li>
6</ul>
7<div id="myTabContent" class="tab-content">
8 <div id="home" class="tab-pane fade active in">
9 ...
10 </div>
11 <div id="profile" class="tab-pane fade">
12 ...
13 </div>
14 <div id="tab3" class="tab-pane fade">
15 ...
16 </div>
17 <div id="tab4" class="tab-pane fade">
18 ...
19 </div>
20</div>

This produces a basic Bootstrap tabbed interface. No additional JavaScript is required here, the base bootstrap.js will handle all the basic event binding necessary for a fully functional interface. But, as you can see, there's not much in the way of contrast, identifying tab separation, nor is your tabbed interface really separated from the rest of your page. What's needed now is to create that contrast and separation.

Skinning Tabs

We'll look to jQueryUI's tab representation, as a guide for how we wish ours to look. We won't get an exact match, but we can get really close. First, let's start with the new stuff. jQueryUI's tab sets have a border around the entire interface, separating the tabs from the rest of page flow. Bootstrap doesn't have this, so we'll make it. We'll add a new div around the nav-tabs unordered list and tab-conent div, and give it a class: nav-tabs-container. Next, we'll add a style declaration to our overrides.less file.

view plain print about
1/* Add a tab container class, for a border around the entire tabset */
2.nav-tabs-container {
3 padding: 3px;
4 border: 1px solid @grayLight;
5 .border-radius(4px);
6}

Here's what we're doing here. We gave the container a 3 pixel padding all the way around. We gave it a one pixel solid light gray border, using the color variable in Bootstrap's variables.less file. Last, we gave it rounded corners with a four pixel radius (for those browsers that support it) by calling on the .border-radius() LESS function that's defined in Bootstrap's mixins.less file.

Our next step is to see what makes jQueryUI's tab interface different. We make a list of the basic elements.

  • The tab bar (ul with a class of nav-tabs) has:
    • a one pixel gray border with rounded corners
    • padding on the left, top, and right of a few pixels
    • a gradient background of a gray that is darker than the tabs
  • The tabs (list item tags containing anchor tags) have:
    • active tab (li with a class of active) has:
      • a white background
      • a one pixel gray border with rounded corners
      • no bottom border
    • inactive tabs (li's without classes) have gray backgrounds, of a lighter gray than the nav-tabs
    • active and inactive tabs have text that is gray

At this point, our next step is to find the original Bootstrap declarations for tabs. These can be found in the navs.less file (/assets/css/bootstrap). Copy and paste these declarations into your overrides.less file. From here, it's a matter of removing lines that won't change, adjusting lines that meet your requirements, and adding any new code needed to finalize those requirements. I'm not going to go over every line of code, instead giving you the full set, but we'll hit the high parts. First, the code:

view plain print about
1/* Tab Theming Overrides */
2// TABS
3// ----
4
5/* Add a tab container class, for a border around the entire tabset */
6.nav-tabs-container {
7 padding: 3px;
8 border: 1px solid @grayLight;
9 .border-radius(4px);
10}
11
12// Give the tabs something to sit on
13.nav-tabs {
14 border: 1px solid @grayLight;
15 padding: 4px 3px 0 3px;
16 margin-bottom: 5px;
17 .border-radius(4px);
18 #gradient >
.vertical(@grayLighter, @grayLight);
19}
20
21// Actual tabs (as links)
22.nav-tabs > li > a {
23 line-height: 10px;
24 background-color: @grayLighter;
25 border: none;
26 outline: 0;
27 &:hover,
28 &:focus {
29 border-style: solid;
30 border-width: 1px 1px 0;
31 border-color: @grayLight @grayLight transparent;
32 }
33 &:link,
34 &:active,
35 &:visited,
36 &:hover,
37 &:focus {
38 color: @gray;
39 }
40}
41
42.nav-tabs > li:not(.active) > a {
43 &:hover,
44 &:focus {
45 padding: 7px 11px;
46 }
47}
48// Active state, and it's :hover/:focus to override normal :hover/:focus
49.nav-tabs > .active > a,
50.nav-tabs > .active > a:hover,
51.nav-tabs > .active > a:focus {
52 border-style: solid;
53 border-width: 1px 1px 0;
54 border-color: @grayLight @grayLight transparent;
55}

We mentioned earlier the use of variables within LESS. Throughout this block of code you will see multiple references to various colors identified in the base Bootstrap variables.less file. We also previously utilized the .border-radius() method from Bootstrap's mixins.less file. We use this again, within this block of code, as well as other mixin methods, such as the .vertical() method we're using in our gradient definition. It's a good idea to look at the mixins.less and variables.less, to get ideas as to what's available to you. You will also notice nested declarations (such as the link psuedo selectors) that will automatically build out with LESS.

That's it! I hope you found this post helpful and informative. Any feedback, please leave me a comment. Here's what I hope you'll takeaway from this post:

  • Bootstrap is a powerful layout framework
  • Bootstrap is easy to modify/skin by making minor modifications using LESS
  • LESS is a great way to create dynamic, adjustable CSS
  • LESS can be a lot of fun