For more than a decade now, I've made a living upgrading legacy applications. Many times, these are applications originally built on ColdFusion 4 (or even earlier) and never touched again. Some company invested thousands, or even tens of thousands of dollars having an application written, adding to it over and over with time, but never refactoring it for a new age.

This is probably the number one issue with how ColdFusion gets viewed, as a language and a platform, from outside the ColdFusion community. There are these huge applications, written on a platform that has grown and moved on, and that old code just doesn't perform the way they want it to anymore. What was written was probably great, at the time, but now there's millions of database transactions, thousands of concurrent users, and changes to processes in general. That old app just isn't cutting it anymore.

The question that comes up for a company, at this point, is do they rewrite the app? Do they upgrade the app? Or do they replace the app all together? Each of these questions have answers with their own pitfalls, but today many companies are looking at this issue and saying that their problem is ColdFusion, instead of seeing it as their answer.

Here's the bottom line: ColdFusion isn't always the answer to every problem. No more so than .NET is, or PHP, or Ruby, or any other particular language. That said, ColdFusion does have a very large advantage, in that it truly is a Rapid Application Development platform. If you know the language, if you know the server, and if you have a solid plan, it is possible to rapidly change an an application, or write a new one.

With this post, I'm going to start a new series of posts about some of the things that I've found, over the past decade, that can be used to bring a legacy application into a new age. There are a number of things that a company can do to bring new life back to that old and frail beast that used to be their pride and joy. More over, some of the things I'll relate can save a company from unnecessarily spending thousands of dollars in redevelopment when they didn't need to do so.